Optional Quiz 3 due 05.04.20

Dear Satirists,

The guidelines for our final, extra-credit quiz are now available on our Quizzes Page.

As noted there, it is due by 11:00 PM (EST) on Monday, May 4. As also noted, I’ll scale down your total to one-quarter, and add that to your overall quiz score. This will encourage you to go for maximum points on the quiz, ensure that the quiz remains as robust an experience as the first two, and preserve the integrity of the other quizzes, which were mandatory.

As always, please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you for a wonderful semester under very challenging conditions. You are my heroes.

DC

Assignment for Wednesday, 04.29.20

Dear Satirists,

For Wednesday, April 29, please do the following.

(1) Read and translate

  • Martial, Epigrams 26, 35, 80, and 18.

(2) Review carefully the compendium (sent via email) of your peers’ annotations on Freudenberg (2018). As before, ask yourselves these questions as you proceed.

  • What did you notice about the piece that your peers did not? And vice versa?
  • Would your peers’ annotations help them with a theoretical semester project on Roman satire? Why or why not?
  • What best practices for annotations might you extrapolate from the compendium?

Thanks again for agreeing to this special class session — one additional day has really made all the difference.

DC

Assignment for Monday, 04.27.20

Dear Satirists,

On Monday, April 27, our modified semester project concludes. Please do the following.

I’ll compile your annotations into one document, and circulate it before class on Wednesday, April 29, which is when we’ll discuss what you all had to say.

Please let me know if you have questions.

DC

Assignment for Friday, 04.24.20

Dear Satirists,

For Friday, April 24, please do the following.

  • Read and translate Martial, Epigrams 23, 25, 29, 31, 37, 38, 45, 51, 60, 70, and 71 (as numbered in the Watson & Watson commentary).

All Latin poetry deserves a content warning of some kind, but this round of poems especially so: primarily sexual content and body shaming, but no doubt you will encounter other themes that challenge our contemporary notions of correctness.

Remember that we read these epigrams in connection with the genre of satire, and not for the purpose of titillating ourselves with naughty verses (as was often the case in schoolboy receptions of Juvenal).

DC

Assignment for Wednesday, 04.22.20

Dear Satirists,

For Wednesday, April 22, please do the following:

(1) Read G. B. Conte on Martial, a contemporary of Juvenal and author of epigrams that do much of the same work as Roman satire. Unlike other Conte essays, you can read this one in its entirety; it’s the perfect length, and it doesn’t need to jump around between authors or separate bodies of work. As usual, note anything that resonates with you, so we can discuss it in class.

(2) Read and translate Martial, epigrams 1, 7, and 19 (as numbered in our Cambridge edition). The commentary by Watson & Watson is very generous, even to the point of prefacing each poem with a helpful summary. Let’s see what these poems have to say, as a group, about Martial and his art.

(3) Download, print, and fill in scansion drill 8. This will be our only formal foray into the elegiac couplet. We’ll discuss it in class, and then you can turn it in by email by Friday.

DC

Assignment for Friday, 04.17.20

Dear Satirists,

For Friday, April 17, please do the following.

(1) Read and translate

  • Juvenal, Satire 3.286–322 — the very end of the poem.

(2) Review carefully the compendium (sent via email) of your peers’ annotations on Moodie (2014). As before, ask yourselves these questions as you proceed.

  • What did you notice about the piece that your peers did not? And vice versa?
  • Would your peers’ annotations help them with a theoretical semester project on Roman satire? Why or why not?
  • What best practices for annotations might you extrapolate from the compendium?

Friendly reminder to turn in your scansion from Wednesday with any necessary corrections before today’s class — if you haven’t already done so.

DC

Assignment for Wednesday, 04.15.20

Dear Satirists,

For Wednesday, April 15, please do the following.

(1) Read and translate

  • Juvenal, Satire 3.171–214.

(2) Download, print, and fill in scansion drill 7.

As is now the custom, we’ll discuss the scansion in class, and then you can turn it in by email before Friday’s class.

DC

Assignment for Monday, 04.13.20

Dear Satirists,

On Monday, April 13, our modified semester project continues. Please do the following.

  • Submit your annotations to me as a PDF by email by noon (EST).

I’ll compile your annotations into one document, and circulate it before class on Friday, April 17, which is when we’ll discuss what you all had to say.

Please let me know if you have questions.

DC

Assignment for Friday, 04.10.20

Dear Satirists,

For Friday, April 10, please do the following.

(1) Read and translate

  • Juvenal, Satire 3.41–80.

(2) Review carefully the compendium (sent via email) of your peers’ annotations on Gold (2012). Ask yourselves the following questions as you proceed.

  • What did you notice about the piece that your peers did not? And vice versa?
  • Would your peers’ annotations help them with a theoretical semester project on Roman satire? Why or why not?
  • What best practices for annotations might you extrapolate from the compendium?

Friendly reminder to turn in your scansion from Wednesday with any necessary corrections before today’s class — if you haven’t already done so.

DC

Assignment for Wednesday, 04.08.20

Dear Satirists,

For Wednesday, April 8, please do the following.

(1) Read and translate

  • Juvenal, Satire 3.1–40.

(2) Download, print (if possible), and fill in scansion drill 6.

As we did the previous week, we’ll discuss the scansion in class, and then you can turn it in by email before Friday’s class.

DC